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Posts Tagged ‘Rome’

Pope Joan ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥
Read by Barbara Rosenblat
19 hrs 24 mins

There are few historical heroines as fascinating and controversial as Pope Joan, a woman whose hunger for knowledge and independent nature led her to pass as a man and ultimately to attain the high seat in Rome. Pope Joan is a spellbinding tale of a woman who gave up everything, even her very name, for the sake of knowledge.

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The Tudors ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥
Read by Robins Sachs

Download (24 hrs and 34 mins)

“More than four centuries after the death of the last Tudor, there continues to be an immense gap between who the various members of the family actually were and what most people–including most people with some knowledge of English history–think they know about them. The real Henry VIII was both a greater and lesser man than the lusty Bluff King Hal of legend, the man who famously had six wives. Elizabeth was vastly more complicated, more pathetic and less noble than the glorious façade behind which she concealed herself. The now-obscure Henry VII, Edward VI, and Mary I were both more important as rulers and far more fascinating as human beings than is commonly understood.” (GJ Meyer) Amazon

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Wolf Hall ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥
Read by Simon Slater
18 discs

With no male heir, the infamous Henry VIII wants to annul his 20-year marriage to Queen Catherine in favor of a marriage to Anne Boleyn. When Cardinal Wolsey fails to convince the Catholic Church to follow his king’s ideas, he falls out of favor. In steps Thomas Cromwell–a blacksmith’s son who has seen his share of hardship. When he is able to give the king his heart’s desire, he finds himself in a powerful position. But his new role is a dangerous one with the volatile king.

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Lost to the West ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥
Read by Lars Brownworth
8 discs

In AD 476 the Roman Empire fell–or rather, its western half did. Its eastern half, which would come to be known as the Byzantine Empire, would endure and often flourish for another eleven centuries. Though its capital would move to Constantinople, its citizens referred to themselves as Roman for the entire duration of the empire’s existence.  An absorbing look at the forgotten Byzantine Empire, its surprising role in shaping Western civilization, and the lessons it holds for modern societies.

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Imperium

Imperium ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥
Read by Simon Jones
12 discs

Tiro’s cautionary tale begins on a cold November morning, when he opens the door to a terrified stranger, a victim of Sicily’s corrupt Roman governor, Verres. The stranger’s arrival sets in motion a chain of events that will eventually propel Tiro’s master into one of the most suspenseful courtroom dramas in history, pitting Cicero against some of the most powerful and intimidating figures of his age: Pompey, Caesar, Crassus, and  other Romans who changed history

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Six Wives: The Queens of Henry VIII ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥
Read by Paul Matthews

This account differs than other collection because it focuses at greater length on political and religious subtleties, and develops an imposing cast of supporting characters. The bulk of the book inevitably deals with Henry’s first two wives, Catherine of Aragon and Anne Boleyn. Accounts of the remaining queens are fleshed out nicely to suggest their personalities, their place in the family networks and religious currents at court and the overall patterns of the king’s infatuations and disillusionments.

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Galileo’s Daughter ♥ ♥ ♥
Ready by George Guidall

9 discs

galileoGalileo Galilei was the foremost scientist of his day. Though he never left Italy, his inventions and discoveries were heralded around the world. His telescopes allowed him to reveal the heavens and enforce the astounding argument that the earth moves around the sun. For this belief, he was brought before the Holy Office of the Inquisition, accused of heresy, and forced to spend his last years under house arrest. Galileo’s oldest child was thirteen when he placed her in a convent near him in Florence, where she took the most appropriate name of Suor Maria Celeste. Her support was her father’s greatest source of strength. Her presence, through letters which Sobel has translated from Italian and masterfully woven into the narrative, graces her father’s life now as it did then. Galileo’s daughter dramatically recolors the personality and accomplishment of a mythic figure whose seventeenth-century clash with Catholic doctrine continues to define the schism between science and religion.

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