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Posts Tagged ‘George Guidall’

Crime and Punishment ♥ ♥ ♥
Read by George Guidall

21 discs

Raskolnikov, a nihilistic young man in the midst of a spiritual crisis, makes the fateful decision to murder a cruel pawnbroker, justifying his actions by relying on science and reason, and creating his own morality system. The aftermath of his crime and detective Petrovich’s murder investigation result in a cat-and-mouse game.  I wanted to be moved.  I wanted to be connected to the plot.  I was not impressed, but see how it has a place of honor in literary history.  Perhaps I would have been drawn in if the reader had been anyone else but Guidall.  There isn’t a thing wrong with his performance, but his pitch is a little too familiar.  There was a time when he narrated nearly every book on the shelf.  I little bit of Guidall goes a long way.  And 21 discs is a long way.

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The Pushcart War ♥ ♥ ♥
Read by George Guidall

The pushcarts have declared war! New York City’s streets are clogged with huge, rude trucks that park where they want, hold up traffic, and bulldoze into anything that is in their way, and the pushcart peddlers are determined to get rid of them. But the trucks are just as determined to get rid of the pushcarts, and chaos results in the city.

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The Assassins Gallery ♥ ♥ ♥
Read by George Guidall

11 discs

Professor Mikhal Lammeck’s specialty is assassins, but even Lammeck is caught off guard when the Secret Service urgently requests his help: a gruesome double murder and suicide in Massachusetts has set off alarm bells. In the waning days of World War II, someone wants one last shot to alter history. An assassinis headed to Washington, D.C., to kill the most important soldier of them all: the U.S. commander in chief.

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Galileo’s Daughter ♥ ♥ ♥
Ready by George Guidall

9 discs

galileoGalileo Galilei was the foremost scientist of his day. Though he never left Italy, his inventions and discoveries were heralded around the world. His telescopes allowed him to reveal the heavens and enforce the astounding argument that the earth moves around the sun. For this belief, he was brought before the Holy Office of the Inquisition, accused of heresy, and forced to spend his last years under house arrest. Galileo’s oldest child was thirteen when he placed her in a convent near him in Florence, where she took the most appropriate name of Suor Maria Celeste. Her support was her father’s greatest source of strength. Her presence, through letters which Sobel has translated from Italian and masterfully woven into the narrative, graces her father’s life now as it did then. Galileo’s daughter dramatically recolors the personality and accomplishment of a mythic figure whose seventeenth-century clash with Catholic doctrine continues to define the schism between science and religion.

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Snow Falling on Cedars ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥
Read by George Guidall
13 discs

snowKabuo Miyamoto, a Japanese American is accused of killing Carl Heine, a respected fisherman in the close-knit San Piedro Island community . Carl’s body had been pulled from the sea, trapped in his own net. His water-damaged watch had stopped at 1:47. The trial occurs in the midst of deep anti-Japanese sentiments following World War II. Covering the case is the editor of the town’s one-man newspaper, Ishmael Chambers, a World War II veteran who lost an arm fighting the Japanese. Torn by a sense of hatred for the Japanese, Chambers struggles with his love for Kabuo’s wife, Hatsue, and his conscience, wondering if Kabuo is truly innocent.

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The Family  ♥ ♥ ♥
Read by George Guidall

12 discs

familyThe story opens with Cardinal Rodrigo Borgia manipulating papal elections in 1492 to become the new Pope Alexander. Determined to establish a family dynasty, he appoints his son Cesare cardinal in his stead and, after a strategically engineered episode of incest between siblings Cesare and Lucrezia, begins ruthlessly eliminating rivals and marrying his children into alliances with the offspring of noble families of France and Spain. But Cesare would rather be a soldier, and Lucrezia would rather marry for love; these conflicted desires contribute as much as risky political power plays to undoing the Borgias in a single generation. The narrative whizzes methodically through highlights of the Renaissance, embellishing events with cameos by Machiavelli, Michelangelo and da Vinci.

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